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The World Wide Web (WWW) 2015

Materials: Electrical cords from various technical and electronic devices.

World Wide Web (WWW)

I created this spider web sculpture focusing on exploring the connection of the medium being electrical cords linking to the rapidly evolving contemporary technology of the World Wide Web (WWW). I am concentrating on the current human culture connection of technology and our everyday reliance of electrical cords. The environmental message of consumerism and the fast changing world of technology becoming obsolete and creating rubbish are still present in this work.

The medium I used to represent the artistic 3D Spider web is electrical cords using constructive methods of weaving, crocheting and knitting to form the natural shapes and structures. Every electronic device we use has a unique cord and almost every new device we purchase to replace the outdated device has a different size cord. Consumer society is full of electronic devices that are designed to be disposable. This source of material is easily accessible as technology is advancing at a breathtaking pace.

In the past 10 years I have learned that my family heritage is linked to the Australian Indigenous community and I am part of the Wiradjuri mob that occupies a large part of central NSW. I was raised in the Central West of NSW in the town called Parkes and my traditional Aboriginal history was not talked about and until now and is lost to me.

I am attempting to relate back to my ancestors to reconnect with my heritage and have discovered strong links that are relevant to me. One fact is that all aboriginal communities including the Wiradjuri people are caretakers of the land living in harmony with the environment; this could explain why I am so passionate about the environment.

Wiradjuri women spent many hours weaving to create items used in everyday life by using grass, water reeds, plants and animal fur to make baskets, scoops, dilly bags and mats. The Wiradjuri men used bark of the Stringybark tree to make rope of various thicknesses.

I have always had a fascination with weaving crocheting, knitting, tapestry, macramé and spinning techniques, which has become very relevant to my current work.

I invited the audience to physically enter and immerse yourself into the web, reflect on own use of cables, walk around, touch, feel and view from different angels. Your direct involvement will allow you to enjoy the whole body experience of the sculptures structure and silhouettes move in the space with you.

World Wide Web (WWW)
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World Wide Web (WWW)
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World Wide Web (WWW)
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World Wide Web (WWW)
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World Wide Web (WWW)
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